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Eddie Adcock, Scottsville native and trailblazing bluegrass musician, won the 2014 Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass Music. Along with national recognition, Adcock received $50,000 and may play a televised show with Steve Martin.
“I’m totally unique,” said Adcock, 76, explaining why he won the prestigious prize. “I don’t play like anyone else. People copy me – I don’t copy them.”
For example, Adcock took a style of guitar playing called Travis picking and modified it for the banjo. “You don’t have enough strings to do it correctly on the banjo unless you figure out something that other people don’t know – which is what I did,” Adcock said.
He also plays a pedal steel style. “Pedal steel people sit behind a steel guitar and have eight or 10 different pedals they push with their feet and knees to make a certain sound,” Adcock explained. “They slide into chords. I figured out a way to mimic that sound without pedals on the banjo.”
These innovations and others like them made Adcock into one of the most revolutionary banjo players in bluegrass music. “All my life I’ve played very progressive,” he said.
But this famous bluegrass player knows where he comes from. “Oh, I got my start in Scottsville,” Adcock said fondly. When he was seven-years-old he began playing a small “squeeze box,” or accordion, and from there moved on to play the organ. “Momma used to pump it and I used to play it,” he said. “I got started from there.”
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Emergency Services Coordinator Cheryl Wilkins.  File PhotoFluvanna County could be billing for ambulance transport as soon as July.
The Board of Supervisors directed staff Wednesday evening (Jan. 21) to develop a few different versions of a cost recovery program to recoup some of the expenses involved in providing ambulance transport to people within the county.
Fire and rescue operations come at a tremendous cost to the county – $1.83 million in fiscal year 2015 (FY15) and possibly $2 million in FY16, said Emergency Services Coordinator Cheryl Wilkins. A cost recovery program could bring in between $600,000 and $700,000 per year, Wilkins said, though she stressed the uncertainty of the estimate. A loaded mile cost, or a charge per mile driven with a patient in the ambulance, could recoup another $350,000 to $400,000 yearly.
Many counties have implemented cost recovery programs, said Wilkins, including Albemarle, Louisa, Nelson, and Goochland. Since cost recovery programs can be structured in many different ways, a Fluvanna work group studied the issue prior to developing a recommended path forward.
The work group recommends a “compassionate billing” approach to cost recovery. In compassionate billing, insurance companies are billed for ambulance transport, and then everyone – insured and uninsured alike – receives a balance bill. Hardship waivers are available for those who can’t afford to pay, and collections take a “soft” approach. Patients typically receive three bills, but then unpaid amounts are forgiven.
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Members of the Fluvanna Fire and Rescue Association (FRA) sat down with the Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors Wednesday night (Jan. 21) to deliver the unwelcome news that the FRA has been unable to determine how to handle the Fluvanna County rescue crisis.
Emergency Services Coordinator Cheryl Wilkins presented three paths of action. Most agreed that option one – maintain status quo – was not a viable choice given that Fluvanna Rescue has only four or five active members. But opinions diverged widely over option two – have Fluvanna Fire absorb Fluvanna Rescue and become Fluvanna Fire and Rescue – and option three – have Lake Monticello Rescue take over all rescue operations in the county. Some disliked all three choices.
Much of the conflict stems from deeply-held loyalties for different areas of the county and a passion for beloved methods of operation. Given that all of fire and rescue services in the county, excepting the current rescue contract crew, are provided by much-needed volunteers, sensitivity to and respect for the persuasions of volunteers is mandatory for county decision makers.
On Dec. 3 supervisors tasked FRA with finding a solution to the rescue crisis within 60 days. At first the FRA asked Lake Monticello Rescue to put together a plan detailing an absorption of Fluvanna Rescue, Wilkins said, but in subsequent meetings option two started making a comeback.
“There’s not consensus either way,” said Supervisor Mike Sheridan.
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 The general category winner was Steve Nichols. Photo by Christina Dimeo GusemanOver 200 people packed the Fluvanna County Public Library on Saturday (Jan. 24) to find out who won the Market Fluvanna contests.
Sipping punch and munching on cookies baked by the culinary arts students at the high school, adults sat shoulder to shoulder while many kids plopped onto the floor up front, eager for a better view. Along the edges of the room were tables filled with artwork submissions from schoolchildren, and adult entries of photographs and graphic art hung on the walls.
The crowd laughed over and over as County Administrator Steve Nichols played winning video submissions filled with cute kids – singing songs, dancing around, or simply declaring Fluvanna “awesome.”
Nichols told the gathered crowd that the contests received 175 “amazing” entries from senior citizens down to preschool-aged children. The county will be able to use the entries in business and community marketing, he said, to attract new businesses and homeowners.
First Nichols announced the winners of the I Love Fluvanna contest, who received certificates, a Fluvanna window cling, and a cash prize. In the school age divisions four videos and two pieces of artwork took top prizes. A video, a book, and an art project won first place in the slots for “best in category.”
In the general category, Nichols himself took first prize for his Luv Fluvanna design. After the presentation Nichols explained his inspiration for the project: “I was driving when I suddenly said, ‘You know what? Fluvanna’s got L-U-V in it.’” After creating mock-ups of his design in different colors, he gave it over to the county to own.
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Lake Monticello. File photoA five-year plan to improve the fishery at Lake Monticello is already underway, in a quiet way, and will get much more active in the next few months, said Ted Makranczy, who chaired the working group that drafted the plan.
The Lake Monticello Owners’ Association is now seeking volunteers to do some of the work and to provide access to their waterfronts for fish habitat, feeders and other needs to help the fish.
The goal is to bring Lake Monticello’s over-stressed fishery back into ecological balance and get the fish in the lake healthy and well-fed again, Makranczy said. A professional fish census of the lake last spring showed that there are two bass for every one bluegill in the lake, instead of the 20 bluegill for every bass that would be a healthy balance. In another sign of a declining fishery, the average size of caught bass has fallen by 45 percent in the last six years.
The LMOA board recently approved the five-year plan, developed in cooperation with well-known fisheries ecology management firm SOLitude, that is designed to return the lake to ecological balance.
“This is a very ambitious, and very necessary, project,” Makranczy said. “It will require a lot of effort by volunteers, as well as a willingness by landowners along the lake to allow habitat and feeders to be installed on their waterfront. But I’m very encouraged – we haven’t really seriously started the recruitment process and we’ve already got a good group of volunteers signed up. But we’ll need more.”
The five-year plan approved by the LMOA board has several parts:
• Installing artificial habitat so baby fish have a place to hide from predators while they grow, at first mainly under docks, where it’s completely out of the way, but later in deeper water, as long as it can be done without affecting boating or swimming or dredging activities.
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