Fluvanna Review

Maria Carter won first place in the oil/acrylic category for Field of Flowers Photo by Page H. GiffordTrilbie Knap, a watercolorist from Charlottesville was the judge for the Fluvanna Art Association’s annual juried show. The show, currently at the Fluvanna County Library through December, features some striking works by members.

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This FlucoFinder column’s goal is to share with the community, information about the schools. Here you will find news of events and activities of public interest, with details and contact information. The FlucoFinder logo was designed by Brendan Murray, a 2013 Fluvanna County High School graduate.
Fluvanna High School
• Ongoing: Mr. David Small’s TV production group will be producing and taping sporting events at School Board meetings for viewing on Charlottesville public access channel 14 and on Lake Monticello’s channel 977.

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Debra Lucado, Renny Megahan, Jeff Craig and Joe Chesser cut the ribbon. Photo by Page H. Gifford Attracting shoppers locally and supporting the newly stocked Fluvanna Ace Hardware (formerly Do It Best) was Joe Chesser’s message to the group of well-wishers gathered at Friday’s (Sept. 12) ribbon-cutting ceremony.

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Fork Union Depot. Photo by Sally Browning.In the early 1900s, a bit of sophistication came to Fluvanna County. The glamorous-sounding Virginia Airline Railway, headed by a hype man called “Captain,” connected the county to such exotic places as Chicago, New York and Charlottesville. Add a comment

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Eddie Adcock, Scottsville native and trailblazing bluegrass musician, won the 2014 Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass Music. Along with national recognition, Adcock received $50,000 and may play a televised show with Steve Martin.
“I’m totally unique,” said Adcock, 76, explaining why he won the prestigious prize. “I don’t play like anyone else. People copy me – I don’t copy them.”
For example, Adcock took a style of guitar playing called Travis picking and modified it for the banjo. “You don’t have enough strings to do it correctly on the banjo unless you figure out something that other people don’t know – which is what I did,” Adcock said.
He also plays a pedal steel style. “Pedal steel people sit behind a steel guitar and have eight or 10 different pedals they push with their feet and knees to make a certain sound,” Adcock explained. “They slide into chords. I figured out a way to mimic that sound without pedals on the banjo.”
These innovations and others like them made Adcock into one of the most revolutionary banjo players in bluegrass music. “All my life I’ve played very progressive,” he said.
But this famous bluegrass player knows where he comes from. “Oh, I got my start in Scottsville,” Adcock said fondly. When he was seven-years-old he began playing a small “squeeze box,” or accordion, and from there moved on to play the organ. “Momma used to pump it and I used to play it,” he said. “I got started from there.”
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