Fluvanna Review

In order to promote all the positives about life in Fluvanna, members of the community have joined with county officials in launching a Market Fluvanna campaign. As a part of this effort, several leaders of non-profit organizations and people-oriented services agreed to answer questions about their county.
Bertha Armstrong, Director of Rural Outreach for MACAA
What is MACAA?

Authorized by the Economic Opportunity Act of 1965, Monticello Area Community Action Agency’s (MACAA) goal is to improve people’s lives by helping them become self-reliant. MACAA achieves this through a variety of programs and skill-development initiatives that serve families and individuals in poverty.
What positives do you see in Fluvanna through your work with MACAA?
Families are able to restore their hopes and spirits by being able to get some relief in crisis situations. We have many resources to offer families. Our resources include rural outreach, which does crisis intervention; Head Start, which promotes early childhood development; Steps to Success, which teaches families financial management; Project Discovery, which promotes academic achievement; Hope House, which provides housing for the homeless or families in danger of homelessness; the emergency food pantry; and thrift shop.
What troubles you about Fluvanna?
Though Fluvanna is a wonderful place to live, I do not feel we have enough economic growth in the county. When our children graduate from high school they have to leave the county for employment. I feel that there is not enough local recreational entertainment for our families. Some of our children or adults never have the opportunity to do things like roller skating or just walking the mall in town. Transportation to local games or to the library is also an issue. But I do feel that the leaders of this county look at the possibility of county growth.
Emily Daidone, Manager of Community Centers and Home Delivered Meal Programs for JABA
What is JABA?

The Jefferson Area Board for Aging (JABA) is committed to promoting, establishing and preserving sustainable communities for healthy aging. We offer a continuum of caring through the provision of programs and services that meet individuals where they are and guide all through the journey of aging with a focus on person-centered care.
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Art by Lorraine LaVistaA few months ago, artist Lorraine LaVista, spoke to the Fluvanna Art Association regarding using Sharpie markers as an alternative art medium. Many embraced the new medium. Currently, LaVista, a member of FAA, is exhibiting her work at the Fork Union Community Center.

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Photo by Tricia JohnsonThe Rivanna and its tributaries which flow through Fluvanna are in poor shape but slowly improving, according to a report from StreamWatch, a non-profit organization which monitors the water quality of the river and streams in its watershed.
Almost half of the sampling sites in Fluvanna County both on the river and along the streams that feed it failed to meet the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) standards for aquatic life.
StreamWatch released its report, “The Biological Health of Streams and Rivers of the Rivanna River Watershed,” in June of 2014.
“Water quality and stream health are vital community interests,” reads the report. “The Rivanna River itself is a heavily used waterway, providing drinking water to many thousands of Central Virginia residents while also receiving stormwater runoff and treated wastewater.”
Data collected from 2011-2013 is compared with information going back to 2003 to illustrate both the current state of the watershed and historical trends.
Sites rated as “fair” or worse fail state standards; of 11 sampling sites in Fluvanna, five rated “fair”, five “good”, and one “very good.” Two of the sampling sites have improved since the last sampling period. While the statistics in Fluvanna County are better than those for the entire watershed, there is concern about the sites that received a “fair” assessment. “Many of the streams rated in ‘fair’ condition are located in rural or sparsely developed areas. Previous studies by StreamWatch and others suggest that some ‘fair’ streams can recover good health with modest changes in management practices,” the report stated.
StreamWatch relies heavily on volunteers – “citizen scientists” – to help assess the sites along the Rivanna River watershed. Groups of volunteers use a fine-mesh net to seine aquatic insects, and then identify and count these insects as indicators of the quality of the site.
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he displays light up to the music of  ten different Christmas favorites like Little Drummer Boy, Carole of the Bells and the theme to A Charlie Brown Christmas.About half the population of Fluvanna County lives behind the gates of Monticello. If you aren’t one of them, now is the time to phone a friend to let you in.
Inside those gates at 4 Lewis Court you’ll find perhaps the best Christmas light show in the whole county.

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Troy Weidenheimer with Fluvanna Art Association members who displayed their abstract artwork.Fluvanna Art Association member and art instructor Troy Weidenheimer returned for another workshop, this time to focus on learning to paint more freely.

That’s not an easy thing to do after years of learning how to structure one’s artwork. To do this, members of the association had to move toward abstraction.

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