Fluvanna Review

Teens working hard at home repairs.  Photo by Tricia JohnsonOver 200 teenager volunteers from across the state spent the week in Fluvanna County working hard at home repairs to make an impact in the lives of senior homeowners.
‘Impact! Virginia – Fluvanna’ was a cooperative effort between the Baptist General Association of Virginia, Fluvanna Habitat for Humanity, the Fluvanna/Louisa Housing Foundation, Fluvanna Meals on Wheels, Effort Baptist Church, and the Central Virginia Baptist Association. Impact! Virginia is an ongoing mission project of the Baptist General Association in which teenagers leave their homes to travel across the state on week-long trips to repair the homes of those in need.
The volunteer construction work was done for seniors who could not have afforded to have the work done themselves. Most of the 12 recipients had their roofs replaced, as well as other smaller repairs performed, such as painting, siding repair, and porch and deck repair. Many of these older Fluvanna residents would soon need to leave their homes were the repairs not made. This work actually allows them to remain, safely and comfortably, in their own homes.
The teens themselves were enthusiastic about the program. Lizzie Swann of Wattsburg called Impact! Virginia an “awesome experience” and added that it was a privilege to “work hard and do the best we can to improve their lives.”
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Troy Weidenheimer with Fluvanna Art Association members who displayed their abstract artwork.Fluvanna Art Association member and art instructor Troy Weidenheimer returned for another workshop, this time to focus on learning to paint more freely.

That’s not an easy thing to do after years of learning how to structure one’s artwork. To do this, members of the association had to move toward abstraction.

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Photo ©iStock.com/Chris Bernard Photography Inc.The decision by the Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors to charge a fee for ambulance usage has stirred enough quitting talk among volunteers that Lake Monticello Volunteer Rescue Squad (LMVRS) Captain Joe Orsolini has called a special meeting of the organization, asking that anyone “contemplating making a serious decision about this action by the Board of Supervisors to please hold off until after the meeting.”

Though Orsolini wouldn’t comment on personnel issues, former LMVRS member Lyle Plitt submitted his resignation two weeks ago and said he knew of three other members planning to do the same.

Some rescue volunteers are opposed to cost recovery, or the practice of imposing fees for ambulance transport, because they don’t believe in charging money for a service they pride themselves on providing for free.

Plitt believes that charging a several hundred dollar fee for ambulance use will keep patients from calling 911 or, if they do call, from accepting transport to the hospital. He also takes issue with the fact that he and his fellow volunteers have been asked to collect insurance information from patients. “I don’t feel it’s appropriate for us to ask sick or injured patients for their insurance information,” he said. “My job is to take care of patients.”

Cheryl Elliott, emergency services coordinator, said that providers would “absolutely not” be expected to gather insurance information from someone gasping for breath, for example. “Right now they already ask for some demographic information,” she said. “The only two different things they’ll ask about is the name of the insurance provider and the policy number. If the insurance information isn’t easily available it can be gotten from the hospital – it just makes the process easier if they can get it from the patient. But never will gathering any information impinge on providing any service.”

Supervisors implemented the cost recovery program, which after a year or two may bring in between $754,787 to $791,723 annually, to help alleviate the $2.4 million yearly price tag for rescue and fire services in the county. When considering what sort of billing model to adopt, supervisors rejected an insurance-only model that would charge insurance companies and forgive any remaining balance, opting instead for a “compassionate billing” program that would bill patients for the balance after insurance pays but would refrain from sending unpaid bills to collections.

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The Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) has announced that the proposed budget for fiscal year 2013 will be adopted on Dec. 6.

The total expected revenue for 2013 is $5.7 million from dues, fees and amenity use fees. Expected non-capital expenditures are anticipated at $5.5 million. More than $1 million is budgeted for three key funds (roads, lake and general) that will be used for capital improvements to property and buildings, according to a press release from the LMOA.

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Maria Nini, grandson Luca and daughter Claudia Cracchiolo.Sal’s is located in Fork Union and in Scottsville and now at Lake Monticello so fans of the restaurant don’t have to go far for their terrific Italian fare.

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