Fluvanna Review

LM BOD candidates Richard Cummings, Page Gifford and Charles HarrelsonThe Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) will hold its 40th Annual Meeting of Members on June 30. This year, the only business for member vote will be the election of two directors from a field of three candidates. Add a comment

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Rob Browning with his art.It was hot, triple digit temperature day and in Palmyra they had no electricity, so things were heating up at Maggie’s house and elsewhere. But by 11, the lights and air conditioning were back on and the artists were chatting with onlookers about their work at the second annual Artist’s Studio Tour.

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David MooreAt the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association meeting Thursday (May 24) the board welcomed a new finance director, decided on how to handle deer and heard about how to protest the proposed Aqua Virginia rate hike.

Association General Manager Catherine Neelley introduced the new Finance Director David Moore. Moore is a Lake resident.

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Fran Kerr with a glass of water from her well. Photo by Tricia JohnsonFrances Kerr and James Tinker have lived in the charming two-story, hundred-year-old farm house in Bremo Bluff for eleven years. They never imagined, when they bought the house, that its proximity to Virginia Power’s Bremo Bluff Power Plant might one day cause them concern.
Dominion Power’s permit application to the Virginia Water Board seeking permission to discharge into the James River contaminated water from coal ash ponds – the remnants of decades of coal-fired power generated at Bremo Bluff – caught the attention of environmental groups, including the James River Association (JRA.) As part of their investigation into the advisability of Dominion Power’s plan, the JRA contacted the power plant’s neighbors and offered to have their wells tested for contamination with toxins associated with coal ash. Kerr and Tinker took them up on their offer, and had their well tested.
The report on the water in their well, indicating the presence of hexavalent chromium, or “chromium six,” alarmed the couple. Although the level of hexavalent chromium did not exceed federal limits for safe drinking water, those levels are now being reassessed by the EPA in the wake of an internal study determining that hexavalent chromium when consumed in drinking water is “likely to be carcinogenic to humans,” causing cancers of the mouth, stomach, and intestines. Inhaled hexavalent chromium has long been known to increase mouth and respiratory cancers, leading the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to establish strict regulations limiting exposure in industries like metal-working. Recent studies show that exposure to the chemical can increase the risk of developing other cancers elsewhere in the body, as it actually alters cellular DNA.
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Peg Redd's artwork

Eight area artists will be participating in the upcoming Second Annual Artist’s Studio Tour to benefit the Fluvanna County Historical Society on June 30 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Historical Society is sponsoring a studio tour to raise money for the Endowment Fund while promoting Fluvanna’s artists.
New to the tour this year are longer hours to allow visitors to reach every studio. Add a comment

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