Fluvanna Review

Lake candidatesLake Monticello Owners Association members will vote for two new board members on June 30. Running for the two seats are Dick Cummings, Page Gifford and Charles Harrelson. The election will fill vacancies created by the expiration of the second three-year term of Don Fickes and the vacant term created by the resignation of Benita Ellen in January.

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Kelly Williams owns the Painted Horse Ranch.The Painted Horse Ranch Bed and Breakfast isn’t all things to all people, but it could be exactly what you need.

Kelly and Mike Williams own the Painted Horse Ranch just east of the Hardware River on Rt. 6. They call it home and so do about a dozen horses the couple train. Kelly envisioned having a place on their peaceful ranch for people who come to have their horses trained could stay and relax.

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LM BOD candidates Richard Cummings, Page Gifford and Charles HarrelsonThe Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) will hold its 40th Annual Meeting of Members on June 30. This year, the only business for member vote will be the election of two directors from a field of three candidates. Add a comment

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Artist David Durovy holds rose intarsia. Photo by Christina Dimeo Guseman

Tucked away on Haden Martin Road is a studio where Fluvanna resident David Durovy works meticulously to create unique wooden art called intarsia.
What started as marquetry, an inlaid form of working with wood, became a new form of art when Durovy’s teacher and intarsia developer Judy Gale Roberts began pulling the designs outward into three dimensions.
“If you’re looking at the image, whatever would be closest to you should be built up,” Durovy explained. “Roberts developed a practice of layering the pieces so they come out in a three-dimensional way.”
Carefully selecting different types of wood for their specific colors, Durovy creates his intarsia without the use of stains. In his rose piece, for example, he used darker and lighter bits of western red cedar with white accents of aspen. He lines up each piece of the pattern with the grain of the wood so that the grain contributes to the three-dimensional feel as it pushes outward. Sometimes he takes an extra step and uses a grinding wheel to make impressions in the wood, such as the fur-like texture on his deer piece.
When Durovy’s wife and daughters sent him to the Smoky Mountains two years ago to take Roberts’ class, he immediately clicked with the art form. “I found I was really quite good at it,” he said.

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Rob Browning with his art.It was hot, triple digit temperature day and in Palmyra they had no electricity, so things were heating up at Maggie’s house and elsewhere. But by 11, the lights and air conditioning were back on and the artists were chatting with onlookers about their work at the second annual Artist’s Studio Tour.

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