Fluvanna Review

Photo by Tricia JohnsonThe Rivanna and its tributaries which flow through Fluvanna are in poor shape but slowly improving, according to a report from StreamWatch, a non-profit organization which monitors the water quality of the river and streams in its watershed.
Almost half of the sampling sites in Fluvanna County both on the river and along the streams that feed it failed to meet the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) standards for aquatic life.
StreamWatch released its report, “The Biological Health of Streams and Rivers of the Rivanna River Watershed,” in June of 2014.
“Water quality and stream health are vital community interests,” reads the report. “The Rivanna River itself is a heavily used waterway, providing drinking water to many thousands of Central Virginia residents while also receiving stormwater runoff and treated wastewater.”
Data collected from 2011-2013 is compared with information going back to 2003 to illustrate both the current state of the watershed and historical trends.
Sites rated as “fair” or worse fail state standards; of 11 sampling sites in Fluvanna, five rated “fair”, five “good”, and one “very good.” Two of the sampling sites have improved since the last sampling period. While the statistics in Fluvanna County are better than those for the entire watershed, there is concern about the sites that received a “fair” assessment. “Many of the streams rated in ‘fair’ condition are located in rural or sparsely developed areas. Previous studies by StreamWatch and others suggest that some ‘fair’ streams can recover good health with modest changes in management practices,” the report stated.
StreamWatch relies heavily on volunteers – “citizen scientists” – to help assess the sites along the Rivanna River watershed. Groups of volunteers use a fine-mesh net to seine aquatic insects, and then identify and count these insects as indicators of the quality of the site.
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David MooreAt the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association meeting Thursday (May 24) the board welcomed a new finance director, decided on how to handle deer and heard about how to protest the proposed Aqua Virginia rate hike.

Association General Manager Catherine Neelley introduced the new Finance Director David Moore. Moore is a Lake resident.

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Newlyweds Clay Hysell and Brent Jacques. Photos by Tricia JohnsonClay Hysell and Brent Jacques have lived together on a small farm just outside Palmyra for the past 14 years. Last week, the two men made Fluvanna history when they became the first gay couple to be married in the county, taking advantage of the recent Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage in Virginia.
Judge Claude V. Worrell married Hysell and Jacques on Oct. 8 in a civil ceremony in the courthouse in Palmyra. Besides the couple and the judge, two witnesses – a clerk and a deputy – attended the bare-bones, brief ceremony.
Hysell and Jacques stood with Worrell before the bench under the great seal of Virginia, in a court room where the laws of the Commonwealth are interpreted and made real by their application to human lives. It seemed fitting that the county’s first gay marriage ceremony – the application of the state’s newest marriage law - happened there.
The judge had the two men clasp right hands, and then read a simple service.
“Clay and Brent, I ask that you both remember to treat yourself and each other with dignity and respect; to remind yourself often of what brought you together today. Give the highest priority to the tenderness, gentleness, and kindness that your marriage deserves. When frustration and difficulty assail your marriage – as these do to every relationship at one time or another – focus on what still seems right between you, not only the part that seems wrong. This way, when clouds of trouble hide the sun in your lives and you lose sight of it for a moment, you can remember that the sun is still there. And if each of you will take responsibility for the quality of your life together, it will be marked by abundance and delight.”
The men took their vows, exchanged rings, and kissed. In this simple ceremony, rich in both sentiment and significance, history was made in Fluvanna County.
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Leslie, Christy and George Cushnie enjoy their new tasting room. Photo by O.T. Holen.Fluvanna’s only winery is growing more than grapes.

Thistle Gate owners George and Leslie Cushnie have opened a tasting room, though the official grand opening is scheduled for early October.

 

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Peg Redd's artwork

Eight area artists will be participating in the upcoming Second Annual Artist’s Studio Tour to benefit the Fluvanna County Historical Society on June 30 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Historical Society is sponsoring a studio tour to raise money for the Endowment Fund while promoting Fluvanna’s artists.
New to the tour this year are longer hours to allow visitors to reach every studio. Add a comment

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