Fluvanna Review

Aqua Virginia is responding to the meter switch-out situation faced by some Lake Monticello customers by re-checking all 4,000 meters from the Lake.
Recently Aqua swapped out 4,000 manual meters, some of which were 20 or 25 years old, for new radio-frequency meters that can be read from a moving vehicle.
But on the month the switch took place, some Aqua customers in the Lake reported receiving unusually high bills that charged them for anywhere from two to 17 times their normal water usage.
Shannon V. Becker, president of Aqua Virginia, told the Fluvanna Review that when his company investigated three such cases, it found that two of them were in fact its own mistake. The data on the old meters had either been misread or misrecorded in the system. In the third case the household really did use an exceptional amount of water, he said.
Becker said Aqua is addressing the issue by manually re-checking each old meter, documenting its reading on a spreadsheet, and taking a photo of the meter face, so that “when people call they have answers.”
With a 4,000-meter swap, Becker said, “it doesn’t surprise me that there were a few manual errors…. We want to make sure that people who have issues are getting them addressed… I don’t want there to be any question that we aren’t doing it right.”

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Catherine NeelleyJust two months into her new job as general manager of Lake Monticello, Catherine Neelley sits confidently in her office, jotting off e-mails. It’s two in the afternoon. She hasn’t eaten lunch yet. She’s been too busy. Add a comment

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Fluvanna County will probably start billing for the use of its ambulances.
By next July a revenue recovery program should be in place, Emergency Services Coordinator Cheryl Wilkins told the Board of Supervisors Wednesday afternoon (Oct. 1).
Revenue recovery is a way for counties to recoup some of the costs involved in providing ambulance transport to its residents by billing “insurance companies and individuals for the cost of emergency transport services,” Wilkins said.
Last May the county requested that the staff study the issue and develop a plan for implementing revenue recovery in Fluvanna. To this end, Wilkins put together a focus group that included members of Lake Monticello Rescue and Fluvanna Rescue.
By making comparisons with other counties using revenue recovery, the group has estimated that Fluvanna could bring in over half a million dollars per year through such a program. This is based on an average charge of $462 per ambulance transport and a 65 percent collection rate.
Wilkins emphasized three “key points” in her presentation: No one will ever be denied services, even those who can’t pay; those who don’t receive ambulance transport would not receive a bill; and most insurance companies already allow for transport charges.
“By not… billing and collecting that amount, we’re basically leaving a lot of money on the table,” Wilkins told the Board.
Wilkins’ group outlined several possible approaches to billing. The county could bill insurance companies only, and decline to send a bill to those without insurance. Or the county could bill insurance companies but send a balance bill to everyone. This method could involve a “soft” approach to collections and the use of “hardship waivers,” or it could involve a “hard” approach to collections. Another option is to use something called a subscription service, though Wilkins said a nearby county found that approach to be “an abysmal failure.”
Supervisor Bob Ullenbruch asked Wilkins if other counties experienced a drop in fundraising after initiating revenue recovery programs. Wilkins replied that the counties she has talked to have not experienced that problem.
Different counties use the funds generated by revenue recovery in different ways, Wilkins said, though most of the set-ups involved earmarking the money in some way for emergency medical services.
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Fluvanna Art Assoication members (front) Page Gifford, Maria Carter,Deborah Nixon, Gayle Bielanski (back) Loli Stams, Izzy Hickey, Mickey Meyer and Carolyn Brown.It was a long time in coming, but a small group of members from the Fluvanna Art Association finally spread their wings and traveled over to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. Member Gayle Bielanski, arranged for a private tour of a couple of exhibits the members were interested in, including the late 19th century and 20th century American art. The members looked in awe at the opulence reflected in the period of the late 19th century. Pam, their guide for the tour, explained this was commonplace for wealthy individuals to display their wealth openly. Pam skillfully combined elements of these periods, to complete an interesting art history as the members toured the American wing.

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The newly opened Panda Chinese restaurant has a lot going for it, food-wise that is. If you’re one of the ones looking for décor and ambiance, Chinese red walls and gold Oriental fans, that is not what Panda is all about. The restaurant offers take-out, a few tables set up for eating in, and catering for small or large parties. It is a place for the true Chinese food lover.

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