Fluvanna Review

Carol Tracy Carr and Camilla WashingtonIt takes courage to run for elected office and commitment to do the job once elected.

After serving on the Fluvanna School Board since 2009, Vice Chair Camilla Washington (Columbia) decided to not run for re-election. Chair Carol Carr (Rivanna) was appointed in February 2012, then ran for and won the seat in November that same year. Carr also decided to step down.

The Fluvanna Review asked them both to share their experiences as a Board member and their thoughts on the work they did.

Camilla Washington

Why were you interested in running for School Board and what convinced you to do it?

My sons, Nick and Chris, were fifth graders at Central Elementary School when the Columbia District seat became available. I had been an active participant in my children’s education since kindergarten and a member of the Parent Teacher Association at Columbia and Central Elementary. I was approached by several teachers in the division to pursue becoming the School Board candidate. As I began to think about the position, I saw it as an opportunity to represent the constituents in my district and have a voice for all children in the division.

What was the mood of the county and the country when you first ran?
In 2009 the economy was being challenged with high taxes and financial instability. Locally, the high school was in the final stages of construction and there was still quite a bit of conflict in Fluvanna about the need for the facility and the funds that were spent on the building. Add a comment

Read more...

Linda Mullin and Susan WalkerMembers of the Fluvanna Art Association (FAA) walked through a door in an artisan building in Charlottesville Nov. 17 and emerged into The Glass Palette, an interactive glass studio owned by Maria DiMassimo and her daughter, Cara, who is known as the glass guru.

Against the backdrop of massive concrete walls stood tables full of bold and colorful iridescent and translucent glass. A variety of styles, shapes and patterns were represented, from thin delicate lacy plates to swirled candy stripe tulip-shaped vases, sculptures, sun catchers, jewelry, picture frames, mirrors and even a dress made in glass.

The dress, startling in its painstaking beauty, was the centerpiece in the room, and stood in front of a door framed with a bold mosaic of glass. Each piece of the dress was special in its design. The cobalt and soft blue circles of glass were woven into the dress with lacy, delicate brass chain link. The bodice, all in glass, gleamed under the bright overhead lights. The FAA members stood in awe, trying to imagine how Cara DiMassimo envisioned the design and executed it. There was even a photo of her wearing the dress, which she said weighs over 20 pounds.

Then it was the members’ turn to create. Maria DiMassio explained the process to those who had never made anything out of glass. She demonstrated the use of glass cutters, which to some looked heavy and industrial. She showed the proper way to cut tiny glass pieces, easily snapping them.

“You cannot cut yourself with these unless you deliberately put your finger in between the blades,” she said. Members laughed, which made them less afraid of handling them.

She discussed the variety of items members could make, from a little plate or bowl to earrings, a pendant, or even a Christmas ornament.

“Everything is created on the flat and then fired twice,” said Maria DiMassimo. The materials could be layered and overlapped, but would get tiny beads of glue on the corner. Add a comment

Read more...

Disc golfWatch your back, pickleball, there’s a new sport in town. Disc golf has finally come to Pleasant Grove.

The first nine holes of an 18-hole course have been staked out and are ready for play. Aaron Spitzer, director of Fluvanna County parks and recreation, said the full course should be completed by spring.

Disc golf follows the basic rules of traditional golf, except instead of trying to sink a ball into a hole, players try to hit an elevated metal basket with a Frisbee or flying disc. The goal is to complete each “hole” in the fewest throws.

The course was first proposed about three years ago. Until now, local disc golfers had to go to Charlottesville or Richmond.   

Players here in Fluvanna will wind their way through the woods behind the Pleasant Grove playground, facing low-hanging branches, dense underbrush, and challenging “dog-leg” throws around bends.

The course was laid out by a professional disc golfer who blazed a path through the trees. Then Spitzer and his father went to work, clearing trees and brush and building small bridges across watery areas. Volunteers, including Eagle Scouts and students, also assisted with trail-building. Add a comment

Read more...

Gabe Andersen and familyLake Monticello’s Gabe Andersen gets fired up by finding simple ways to make others’ lives better.

“Making seemingly insignificant changes to how we do things on a daily basis can cause county, country and worldwide ripples if done as a group,” Andersen said.

That’s why earlier in the year he founded Community Ripple.

“My neighbor and I had both unknowingly hired tree companies to do some work on our properties one day apart from each other,” Andersen wrote in an email. “I was sitting there watching from my deck this scene play out and realized how it was costing us more money as well as [creating] unnecessary traffic, pollution and potential road fatalities simply because we didn’t know each other’s plans.”

Joining Community Ripple is free. Not too long ago, Andersen celebrated the 1,000th member. He’s looking forward to adding a zero to that number because the more people who join, the more impact it will have.
Community Ripple’s greatest need is more members.

“Watching potential clients’ mouths drop when I walk them through the simplicity of it all is really exciting,” Andersen said. “You can join in 10 seconds by going to communityripple.com and start saving and connecting today.”

It’s all about making the best use of time and resources within the community. Add a comment

Read more...

Free throwThe Flying Flucos girls’ basketball team hosted the Little Giants from Waynesboro in their home opener Tuesday (Nov. 28). Though the girls played hard, they fell in the final minutes 54-59.

The Flucos jumped to an early lead and held it until the middle of the fourth quarter. They led by nine points at 51-42, with approximately four minutes left in the game. Unfortunately, the Flucos had free throw troubles and the Little Giants came on strong, outscoring the Flucos 17-3 in final four minutes.

Every basketball coach laments missed free throws and Fluco Coach Chad White had a lot to lament in this regard after the game. It was just one of those nights for a team that will surely do better from the line as the year progresses. It is hard to win a tightly contested game when the team goes 11-27 from the foul line for the game and 4-11 in the final period. Obviously, better free shooting could have changed the result of the Flucos opener.

The game started well for the Flucos. Senior post player Jemika Johnson opened the scoring by making two free throws. Sophomore forward Mya Wright followed with a three-point shot from the wing for a 5-0 lead. Sophomore Kyia Scott scored on a fast break and the Flucos were off to a 7-0 lead. After a time-out Waynesboro got its footing and started to get back in the game. The quarter ended with the Flucos up 12-9. Freshman guard Destini Monroe contributed a three-point basket for the Flucos.

Waynesboro outscored the Flucos 12-10 in the second quarter to cut the lead at halftime to a single point. The Flucos were led in the second quarter by sophomore guard Nevaeh Ivory who put in six of the Flucos’ 10 points.
In the third quarter, both teams opened up a bit on offense, and after scoring a total of 21 and 22 in the first two quarters, the teams combined for 31 points in the third. The Flucos scored 16 on eight two-point scores. However, they were 0-4 from the line. Ivory again led the Flucos with six points in the quarter. Johnson had four.
Add a comment

Read more...