Fluvanna Review

A Fluvanna County Circuit Court jury awarded $397,215 in damages Thursday evening (July 23) to the Lake Monticello Owners’ Assocation (LMOA) in its suit against Watershed Services, Inc.
The money is for damages and attorneys’ fees, said Catherine Neelley, LMOA general manager.
Conversely, the jury awarded Watershed Services $13,085 in its countersuit against LMOA.
LMOA’s lawsuit against Watershed Services claimed that Watershed Services failed to perform certain repairs for which it was contracted and paid.
LMOA hired Watershed Services for services including repairing the Tufton dam and sluiceway, replacing an underwater drain valve at the Tufton dam, fixing the main dam sluiceway, replacing a main dam underwater valve, and repairing filter drains at both dams.
By July 2011, the lawsuit stated, Watershed Services said its work was 95 to 99 percent completed, and was paid accordingly. But “in reliance upon the defendant’s representations, the association paid the defendant money for work which the defendant knew had not been done,” the lawsuit claimed.
In the spring of 2012, LMOA discovered that the Tufton dam valve didn’t work, the lawsuit stated. There were also problems with the filter drains at the main dam and with a sluiceway extension. “Excavation of those areas revealed that they had been installed improperly and are not functioning as designed to ensure the stability of the dam,” the lawsuit stated.
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Photo courtesy of Samuel BrownTucked away by the main dam in Lake Monticello is an old family cemetery that has fallen into disrepair.
Standing side by side with grave markers are towering weeds. One headstone has broken completely off. And boat trailers crowd up against the gate surrounding the cemetery.
In the cemetery are buried the Boston family – a family that once was prominent in this area and after whom North and South Boston Roads are said to be named – including two Confederate officers. Old faded flags adorn the spots where they lay.
Samuel Brown of Louisa and Matt Smith of Lake Monticello, two young Civil War reenactors, have been trying for several years, they said, to see if the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) would move the boat trailers away from the cemetery fence and maintain the area inside.
“It should be a historical landmark,” Brown said. “It belongs to the colonel and his family. It should be kept up as nicely as possible. Confederate veterans are classified as American veterans and should be treated as such.”
Reuben Beverly Boston was the last colonel in command of the 5th Virginia Cavalry, said Jim Scott, Lake Monticello resident and local historian. He was killed at the Battle of High Bridge on April 6, 1865, Scott said, though his tombstone reads April 7.
His younger brother, Fontaine Chesterfield Boston, was also a Confederate officer with the 5th Virginia Cavalry, said Scott. “The whole Boston family is in that cemetery,” he said. “Mother, father, all six children are there.”
The dilapidated state of the cemetery doesn’t sit well with Brown and Smith. “Headstones are fallen and missing,” said Brown. “You can tell from the overgrowth that no maintenance is done on it. And the boat trailers should be moved away. I feel like those are disrespectful.”
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Photo courtesy of Samuel BrownIn a move that has generated significant online buzz, the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) denied Louisa resident Samuel Brown, a Civil War reenactor, permission to hold a ceremony honoring Confederate soldiers at the Boston family cemetery on LMOA property, where two Confederate officers are buried.
Brown intended to hold a ceremony Friday morning (July 24) at the small cemetery near the marina when he received word from Catherine Neelley, LMOA general manager, that he was prohibited from doing so.
The situation quickly grew explosive as both sides reported threats of legal action or possible pressed charges.
Brown, who belongs to a Civil War reenactment group, has already pulled up the “old and moldy” flags by the graves of Confederate officers Reuben Beverly Boston and Fontaine Chesterfield Boston in order to clean them and present them to any surviving descendants. During the ceremony he intended to replace them with new flags. “We were going to do a simple honor guard, do a salute in our uniforms, plant the flags, have the bagpiper play a song, have the preacher preach, do a prayer, and call it a day,” he said. “It wasn’t going to last half an hour to an hour.” Brown estimated about 20 people were planning to attend.
Brown said he has been trying for years to have someone from LMOA acknowledge his requests to have the cemetery fixed up and cared for, and to have the nearby boat trailers moved back from the cemetery fence. He called the current state of the cemetery “disrespectful.”
But Neelley said she hasn’t heard a word about any requests in her three years as LMOA general manager. And when she received Brown’s request to hold the ceremony, which initially contained a 21-gun salute, she denied it. Guns may not be discharged within Lake Monticello.
Brown responded by canceling the 21-gun salute part of his request, but informed Neelley that his group would still replace the flags at the headstone, an action which he said was “protected under a federal veterans law.”
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Art by Lorraine LaVistaA few months ago, artist Lorraine LaVista, spoke to the Fluvanna Art Association regarding using Sharpie markers as an alternative art medium. Many embraced the new medium. Currently, LaVista, a member of FAA, is exhibiting her work at the Fork Union Community Center.

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he displays light up to the music of  ten different Christmas favorites like Little Drummer Boy, Carole of the Bells and the theme to A Charlie Brown Christmas.About half the population of Fluvanna County lives behind the gates of Monticello. If you aren’t one of them, now is the time to phone a friend to let you in.
Inside those gates at 4 Lewis Court you’ll find perhaps the best Christmas light show in the whole county.

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