Fluvanna Review

Linda Bethke paintingThis year, the annual People’s Choice Award Show, sponsored by the Fluvanna Art Association (FAA), was full of surprises. It featured a variety of artists and an eclectic mix of mediums. Unlike the annual show judged by a professional, the public chooses the three best in each category.

Also, School Board member Carol Carr stopped by the show and reception to accept a check for $500. Of that total $250 will go to the Fluvanna County High School art department and $250 will support the Fluvanna Middle School art department. The proceeds came from the recent art tag sale held in July. Carr also had a look around and talked with artists.

As art itself evolves, so do the methods and tools contemporary artists use. No longer is art in its purest form the norm. The subjects were wide and varied, from abstracts to landscapes, collage, still life photography, illustrations, wood carvings and unfinished work. It was a difficult choice for many. Add a comment

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When I wrote my homework column, called “Dear school system: Let my son be a child” (Sept. 21 issue), I had no idea that my deep-rooted questions regarding the impact of public school life on childhood would resonant so profoundly with my neighbors.

The column rocketed to the top of the Fluvanna Review’s Facebook statistics, eventually becoming the highest-performing post in the paper’s history. The overwhelming response was even more notable because the post was an opinion column, not a shocking news story. Clearly I had struck a chord.

But I also had no idea when I wrote my column that anyone would think I was impugning the teacher who assigned the homework in question. In fact, I went out of my way to ensure that I did not. I mentioned multiple times my own experience as a teacher, made sure I spoke about school systems as a whole rather than teachers, and included the following paragraph at the end of the column. It bears repeating.

As a former teacher, I am keenly aware of the pressure dynamic in education. School Boards and superintendents bear down on principals and teachers. But they, in turn, can be held hostage to state and federal regulations that can tie desperately-needed money to test results. Though there is much to celebrate in public school systems, there is much that needs to change.

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VolleyballIn a high school volleyball match, a team must win three games to prevail. Most matches end 3-0 or 3-1. It is unusual for teams to be so evenly matched that a fifth and deciding game is required. On Tuesday (Oct. 3) the Fluco volleyball team fought hard against a tough opponent to force a fifth game, but ultimately lost 3-2 to Albemarle.

The Patriots from Albemarle won games two and three relatively easily. However, the Flying Flucos did not fade away. In the first game of the match, the Patriots led 24-18 with the serve and seemingly had game one locked up. However, Albemarle lost the point on its serve making the score 24-19. Evynne Stafford took over serve for the Flucos and they ran off five points in a row to tie the score at 24-24. Christina Walker had two impressive kill shots at the net in this five-point run. Albemarle finally broke serve to go ahead 25-24.  Fluco Coach Christi Harlowe-Garrett called timeout.

After the timeout, another Walker kill shot tied the score. Walker took the serve and fired an ace to give the Flucos a one-point lead. Albemarle scored on Walker’s second serve and it was tied again. Albemarle’s serve was into the net and the Flucos were up by one again. Delaney Reed took over serve for Fluvanna and fired an ace for a 28-26 win. It was an impressive comeback win for the Flucos in game one.In game two, after 23 points, the Flucos trailed by only one at 11-12, but Albemarle followed with a four-point run and a five-point run. The Flucos trailed 14-21 when Albemarle ran off another four points in a row to win game two 25-14. Albemarle ended the game with an impressive 13-3 advantage in the final 16 points. Add a comment

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Charles PayneWhen we think of Fluvanna history, we think of people like “Texas” Jack Omohundro, the Timberlakes, and other notables who designed buildings, fought in battle and blazed trails. Few ever mention those who came after, growing up in humble beginnings in rural Fluvanna. They were trailblazers of a different kind, who made sacrifices, withstood trials and faced obstacles. A woman named Chris was one of those people who is rarely talked about, but who made a significant impact in the lives of those who knew her.

In his book titled Chris, Charles Payne talks about Chris and her unique journey through life as a single mother and a woman who made it in a male-dominated world when it was difficult to do so.

“Chris was an extraordinary woman – a product of the Great Depression who had unflagging determination to improve her life and a can-do attitude,” said Payne. This inspired him to write her story.

The book opens around 1910. Payne sets the scene with the innovations, economy and society of that time, and the marriage of Chris’ parents in 1911. Chris was related to the Perkins and Morris families in Fluvanna.
Payne would not give too much away about his story, including Chris’ last name, where in Fluvanna she lived, or his relationship to her, but he did say the family suffered many hardships during the Depression.

“Chris had several siblings and during those years they suffered life-shattering losses and deprivation. They lost everything they had, forever altering the paths of their lives, and death stalked them,” said Payne. “Remember also, in World War II women did many men’s jobs. Chris was tall, slender, pretty, outgoing and kind hearted, but she was also fiercely tenacious and brighter than she or anyone else realized until her accomplishments began to be noticed.” Add a comment

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This FlucoFinder column’s goal is to share with the community, information about the schools. Here you will find news of events and activities of public interest, with details and contact information. The FlucoFinder logo was designed by Brendan Murray, a 2013 Fluvanna County High School graduate.
Fluvanna High School
• Ongoing: Mr. David Small’s TV production group will be producing and taping sporting events at School Board meetings for viewing on Charlottesville public access channel 14 and on Lake Monticello’s channel 977.

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