Fluvanna Review

Fork Union Depot. Photo by Sally Browning.In the early 1900s, a bit of sophistication came to Fluvanna County. The glamorous-sounding Virginia Airline Railway, headed by a hype man called “Captain,” connected the county to such exotic places as Chicago, New York and Charlottesville. Add a comment

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A small crowd gathered at the Board of Supervisors meeting Wednesday night (July 16) to watch supervisors debate the newest iteration of the Walker’s Ridge development – known as Poplar Ridge. But the tension – and most of the people – disappeared from the room when Chairperson Mozell Booker announced the Board’s decision to postpone the matter to another night.
Poplar Ridge, which would be located off of Rt. 644 near Palmyra, would have 317 single-family housing units and a maximum of 74,000 square feet of commercial space. When the Planning Commission discussed the matter on June 25, it unanimously recommended denial based partially on the concern that not enough groundwater exists to support the development.
The day of the supervisors’ meeting the Board received word that Fluvanna County staff now believes that there may be enough groundwater for the 317 homes. But without ample time for supervisors, the developer, or the public to assimilate the information, supervisors felt that deferral was the fairest course of action.
“You need to know everything that we know when we make decisions so that you can make comments in relationship to everything we have,” Booker told the approximately 60 citizens gathered for the public hearing.
“This is too important an issue – whether it’s turned down or whether it’s approved – to not do right,” Supervisor Bob Ullenbruch agreed. “We want to make sure things are done correctly. Unfortunately, it can’t be done in a matter of a couple of hours.”
So with apologies to the public for the inconvenience, supervisors deferred the issue to their Aug. 6 meeting.
Next on the docket was a presentation from Sheriff Eric Hess, who requested an additional school resource officer for the middle and elementary schools to share. Currently the county only has one school resource officer at the high school.
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Columbia Mayor John Hammond  answered questions during the town meeting held on July 15. Photo by Tricia JohnsonThe vote to decide whether Columbia drops its designation as a town will be a historic and difficult one.
Mayor John Hammond called the responsibility for the process a “heavy load” during a sometimes contentious town meeting held July 15 to discuss dissolving the town’s charter for financial reasons.
Former Columbia Mayor Lizz Lane echoed Hammond’s thought.
She said that the town has had a town council and mayor since 1788, and “Washington wasn’t even inaugurated until 1789.” But she also expressed her support for the move to disincorporate the town. Lane said it’s important to honor Columbia’s history, but not when it is to the detriment of the community. Columbia has recently been identified by Preservation Virginia as one of Virginia’s most endangered historic sites.
Other residents - most of them former town council members - also expressed their support for dissolving the town’s charter.
Hammond also assured residents that the Fluvanna Historical Society would work with the town to preserve its history.
Should the issue of disincorporation make it to the ballot in November, Columbia residents themselves will decide with their votes whether or not Columbia remains a town, or becomes another community in Fluvanna County.
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Comedian Sid Davis will perform in Fluvanna on Oct. 20.The Fluvanna Arts Council’s 14th season is moving in a new direction, bringing in more local talent, some familiar favorites and some newcomers and lower ticket prices. Kicking off the 2012-2013 season on Oct. 20 is comedian Sid Davis from North Carolina. Davis’ act is described as family-friendly fun and invigorating. Davis pokes fun at everyday events and keeps audiences rolling with laughter. Add a comment

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It was opening day at the Fluvanna Farmers Market on April 3. Once again the people of Fluvanna can buy truly locally grown fresh produce where the person they meet is the person who grew it. 
We are pretty strict about that. Co- manager Jutta Glasscock visits farms to be sure, if they say they grew it, they did!  We are unique among markets and CSA’s – where sometimes produce is purchased regionally for resale.

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