Fluvanna Review

Pleasant Grove meadow saplings are planted in protective tubes. Photo by Tricia JohnsonMany of the bush-hogged fields of Pleasant Grove Park will soon be replaced by the wild natural beauty of meadows.
Fluvanna County Parks and Recreation Director Jason Smith has been working with Walter Hussy of Rivanna Master Naturalists; Will Shaw of the Department of Public Works; and representatives from the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, John Thompson of the Cooperative Extension Service; and the Department of Forestry to develop a plan that lets nature take its course.
“We have a perfect opportunity at Pleasant Grove – the gem of Fluvanna County – to put this region’s natural history on display,” said Smith. “We are trying to perfect what nature gave to us.” Nature trails will wind through the meadows and the forests of Pleasant Grove, giving visitors a chance to experience different habitats and perhaps encounter wildlife.
Part of the plan included planting borders of wildlife-friendly trees in hedgerows around the meadows. All of the hedgerows will connect back to existing forest, giving wildlife an avenue to travel through and around the meadows. These trees were purchased with a $2,250 grant from the Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District, which was sought and won by the Office of Public Works under Will Shaw. “The grants supplied us some native trees and shrubs that are both food and covering species bordering hedgerows,” said Shaw. Because of the grant, and the willingness of non-profits and other agencies to work together, Fluvanna County has not had to contribute money to the program. In fact, the county may end up saving money, since the fields will no longer need to be maintained.
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It was opening day at the Fluvanna Farmers Market on April 3. Once again the people of Fluvanna can buy truly locally grown fresh produce where the person they meet is the person who grew it. 
We are pretty strict about that. Co- manager Jutta Glasscock visits farms to be sure, if they say they grew it, they did!  We are unique among markets and CSA’s – where sometimes produce is purchased regionally for resale.

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Some Lake Monticello residents knew about the high water and sewer bills before they bought their homes. But anyone who moved to the Lake before 2005 has been in for a real surprise.
The following chart details the year Aqua Virginia made its requests for rate increases, the State Corporation Commission (SCC) case number for each rate case, the amount of additional annual revenue requested by Aqua, the amount of additional annual revenue the SCC granted to Aqua at the end of each rate increase, the rates set by the SCC, the percentage the increases represented, and the total amount of a monthly water and sewer bill for the typical Lake Monticello customer using 3,150 gallons per month.
The rate increase of 1996 was made by the Lake Monticello Service Company. The rates put into effect after that rate case were Aqua’s initial rates when it purchased the system in 2003.
Ken Schrad from the SCC provided three of the case numbers and some figures, especially those from 1996. The rest of the information was obtained from researching the SCC’s website, with the exception of the percentages, which were computed from the figures.

 

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John Anderson looks at debris from his house fire. Photos by Tricia JohnsonA fire Dec. 15 destroyed the home of John Anderson of 97 Deer Lane in the Cloverdale area of Fluvanna. No one was injured
“He was cooking bacon on his electric range,” said Fluvanna Fire Chief Mike Brent, “and he went in to take a shower. When he came back out, the top of the electric range was on fire, and the curtains above the back of the range were burning. By then the kitchen was fully involved,” said Brent. “He basically had time to just get himself out.”
Brent said the Red Cross has been contacted, and added that Anderson, who lived alone, does have family in the area.
Residents said that the small wooden house was one of the oldest homes in the Cloverdale area.
Many gathered had great attachment to the home. “I have a lot of memories of this old place – I was raised here,” said Maurice Brown. “This was our family homeplace,” he added, shaking his head.

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Art by Lorraine LaVistaA few months ago, artist Lorraine LaVista, spoke to the Fluvanna Art Association regarding using Sharpie markers as an alternative art medium. Many embraced the new medium. Currently, LaVista, a member of FAA, is exhibiting her work at the Fork Union Community Center.

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