Fluvanna Review

Palmyra native Dustin Greenwood with teammates Adrian Adams and Nic Taylor.  The fourth member of their team, Alana Taylor is the first female driver of a  U.S. four-man bobsled.  Photo courtesy of Diane GreenwoodDustin Greenwood, a former Fluco standout athlete, hopes to ride his bobsled to the medal stand at the 2018 Winter Olympics.
“I want to be able to represent the Flucos at the games,” said Greenwood, who graduated from FCHS in 2004 and whose parents, Diane and Gary Greenwood, live in Fluvanna.
On Nov. 9, Greenwood was named to the U.S. bobsled team – with a special distinction: he is part of the first mixed-gender, four-man bobsled team to compete. The unique team has already proven its worth - they earned bronze and silver medals at Calgary’s North American Cup in November.
Greenwood told the Fluvanna Review, “Growing up in Fluvanna has given me so much… I can’t thank my coaches and teachers enough for helping prepare me for this road I’m on. Most of them may not realize how much of an impact they have had on shaping the person that I am today.”
His father admits bobsledding is a surprising choice for an athlete from the South more accustomed to football and track. “We didn’t see the bobsled coming,” Gary Greenwood said with a laugh. “It is kind of neat to see a kid from Fluvanna County succeed this way. Dustin’s story will let people know that you can come from any walk of life, and as long as you’ve got a big heart and work hard, you can accomplish your goals.”
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Photo by Jacki HarrisEvery cook has a favorite recipe – a good tried-and-true standby that’s requested at family gatherings or made for weekend comfort food. And often those popular dishes come straight from holiday menus, when food tastes twice as good because of the loved ones gathered around.
The cooks on staff at the Fluvanna Review took the plunge by sharing some of their favorite recipes – and not shying away from revealing the secret ingredient or technique that makes their food so good.

Stuffed ham
Jacki Harris, advertising/copy editor
To me Thanksgiving means stuffed ham. My mother gathers with some of her sisters and friends and they spend between four and five hours preparing the dish. They stuff a corned ham with a mixture of kale, cabbage, onions, red pepper and other spices. The result is a dish that is slightly spicy, salty, and delicious.
What’s the secret technique?
The ham isn’t just stuffed in the middle like a turkey. It’s the cutting and stuffing that makes the preparation last so long. They cut about 10 slits deep into the ham and stuff them full, then pack the rest of the stuffing around the ham. After that they put the whole thing into a cheesecloth bag and boil it for hours. After the ham – which is usually between 18 and 20 pounds – is stuffed and boiled, they divide it amongst the cooks.
The dish isn’t very well-known outside of the borders of southern Maryland and recipes vary by family and are passed along from generation to generation. Last year there was a corned ham shortage and all of the locals were up in arms. We ate our ham at Christmas instead. Thinking of my mother gathering with family and friends, laboring together to create a delicious dish, always makes me smile and look forward to my annual serving of ham.
Sweet potatoes with marshmallows
Page Gifford, correspondent
My favorite Thanksgiving recipe – sweet potatoes with marshmallows – was handed down to me by my mother. It was the butter and brown sugar that she put in it that really made it good. Between that and the marshmallows it would just melt in your mouth.
What’s the secret ingredient?
I add a little cinnamon to mine.
Roasted root vegetables
Tricia Johnson, correspondent
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If Aqua Virginia has its way, the company will begin charging an additional fee to its customers up front to fund its infrastructure projects.
This fee, called the water and wastewater infrastructure service charge (WWISC), would be separate from Aqua’s base charges and water and sewer rates – or any water and sewer rate increases. Aqua is currently petitioning the State Corporation Commission (SCC) for an 8 to 21 percent increase in water rates and a 4 to 13 percent increase in sewer rates.
Having a WWISC would allow Aqua to replace critical infrastructure more quickly and to save money in the process, explained Aqua Virginia President Shannon V. Becker. Emergency fixes in the middle of the night can cost three to 10 times as much as planned maintenance, he said, because of overtime, rush demand, and the inability to bid anything out for competitive prices. Plus this method increases transparency, he said, because the proposed WWISC regulations call for Aqua to file an infrastructure improvement plan in advance with the SCC.
But some of Aqua’s customers at Lake Monticello aren’t convinced. “The rates paid by consumers that are set by the SCC include infrastructure as part of that rate structure,” said Mike Harrison, treasurer of the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) Board of Directors. “If they get both approvals for the WWISC and the rate increase, they’re double-dipping us.”
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Deep Run Hunt Club.  Photo by Tricia JohnsonFox hunting in Fluvanna

First things first: the fox is just fine. In fact, the fox (or, sometimes, coyote) is always fine when Deep Run Hunt Club holds its fox hunts. Their goal is to give their hounds, their horses, and themselves the incomparable thrill of the chase; their quarry, the wily fox, always escapes in the end.
The horses stamped their hooves and shook their heads, bridles jingling. The hounds milled about, intently watching the huntsman, eager for his signal to begin the chase. Riders finely dressed in buff breeches, knee-high glossy riding boots, and fitted jackets chatted as they waited for the hunt to commence. Sunnyside Farm, near Wilmington, was host to more than 40 fox hunters on Nov. 13; the forests, fields, and Rivanna River bottom echoed with the baying of hounds and thunder of horses’ hooves once again.
To the casual observer, little has changed since the days when George Washington and Thomas Jefferson rode to the hounds. A painting of the gathered hunters waiting on the crest of a hill on this beautiful Central Virginia autumn afternoon could be framed and hung next to a hunt print of 200 years ago, and one would be hard pressed to guess which century either painting came from. The hunters, the horses, and the hounds form an iconic image familiar to almost any Virginian.

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In a few months the water and sewer bills at Lake Monticello might get even bigger, thanks to Aqua Virginia’s proposed rate increase and infrastructure service charge.
So the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) Board of Directors established an ad hoc committee tasked with digging up information in opposition to the increases, said Board Treasurer Mike Harrison.
Aqua has petitioned the State Corporation Commission (SCC) for an 8 to 21 percent increase in its water rate and a 4 to 13 percent increase in its sewer rate. It has also asked for the implementation of a water and wastewater infrastructure service charge (WWISC) that would have customers providing advance funding for Aqua’s eligible capital projects.
Chair Ida Swenson said that her committee’s work goes beyond simply trying to get the SCC to nix the bill increases. “Our number one demand is to deny the rate increase,” she said, “but we’re also asking that policies and rules at the SCC be changed.”
The problem isn’t Aqua, said Harrison – it’s the SCC. “It’s Aqua’s job to make money,” he said. “They’ve stated as a matter of corporate policy that they want to go into states with low regulations. We have a situation here: our SCC, which is supposed to be watching out for the consumer in the regulation of rates and charges, is not.”

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