Fluvanna Review

Award-winning barbecue, eight hours of live local music, and beer from 15 craft breweries on a summer afternoon at beautiful Pleasant Grove – who could ask for more? The Fluvanna County Chamber of Commerce’s 4th annual BBQ, Bands & Brews event is Saturday, June 27, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Tickets are $8 in advance or $10 at the gate, and children aged 12 and under get in for free. Beer tokens may be purchased for $5 each.
“Now our attendees can pay an additional $5, and be a judge for a day,” explained Scott Valentine, president of the Fluvanna Chamber of Commerce. “They can sample all five BBQ vendors’ foods…it will be a ‘People’s Choice’ on who wins.” Judging will be over at 2 p.m., so people interested in helping to pick the next winner should be sure to get there before then. 
“Our returning champion, Buckshot BBQ, will be there to defend their title,” Valentine said. Buck Island BBQ, Smokin’ Joe’s BBQ, Red Hub, and B Blues BBQ will also be competing for bragging rights.
Valentine added that he felt that last year, the chamber “got it right,” and that there will be few changes in this year’s program. One big difference, however, is that now Pleasant Grove House is open to the public – so attendees can tour the house and see the transportation history exhibits. Another change is the new stage, which should improve the quality of the sound of the bands that are playing.
A returning favorite at this family event will be the children’s play area, available for an additional fee. Also, if they make arrangements ahead of time by calling the chamber office, families can bring a small tent or canopy to set up in a designated area for a $20 fee. “The last two years have been very hot, and shade was a valuable thing to have,” Valentine said with a laugh. “So far, at least, it looks like this Saturday should be cooler than in previous years.
“We will have a lot of vendors this year,” Valentine said. “Some returning vendors from last year and a lot of new ones,” he said, adding that new vendors have been calling all week. At last count, at least 40 vendors were planning to attend.

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The busyness of summer creates ample opportunities for fun with friends and neighbors. But a quick decision in a hurried moment can lead to painful consequences if laws are broken. And sometimes well-intentioned folks don’t even realize what they’re doing is illegal. On the flip side, some people fret over actions that are actually not against the law.
With this in mind, the Fluvanna Review assembled a summer law survival guide so folks could know how to keep their fun safe and legal – and not worry about things that in reality are just fine.
Open containers
The phone rings. Your friend wants you to come over for a spontaneous get-together at his house. Before you leave you grab your bottle of gin. It’d be fun to mix up some martinis for your buddies. Suddenly you pause. The bottle has been opened – you had some the other night. Can you bring it with you in the car? Or will you get busted?
The answer is yes, you can bring it, but close it up tightly and put it in the trunk. Think of it as you would a firearm, said Jeff Haislip, Fluvanna County commonwealth’s attorney. Is it within reach? Is it out of the way of the driver? If it’s in the passenger seat or even the backseat you could be in trouble if you get pulled over.
Many times deputies run into folks who have been drinking and there’s an open container in the car, Haislip said. The driver has access to it but claims it’s the passenger’s. “You can’t really expect the officer on the side of the road to decide whose it is and whose word to take for it,” he said. “So the safest thing to do is pop it in the trunk.”
No one in a car may drink – not just the driver. “The officer can’t be in a position of believing whether someone handed it over the seat or whether the driver had it,” Haislip said. “If you can’t wait until you’re at a restaurant or at a friend’s house to have a drink then you probably have bigger problems.”
Serving alcohol to kids
“What are you drinking, mom?” your daughter asks.
“Beer,” you answer.
“Can I try it?” she says. And now you have a dilemma.
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Linda Lenherr, 62, is seeking re-election as Fluvanna County treasurer, a position she has held since 1984. Challenging her bid is opponent Ben Hudson.
Lenherr pointed to her accomplishments as treasurer over the past 31 years. “When I took office in 1984 nothing was on a computer system,” she said, “so getting everything on a computer – all of the technology, all of our banking is electronic – was an achievement.”
One of Lenherr’s most important accomplishments, she said, is good customer service. “My door is open to all of the taxpayers at any time,” she noted. She has also made strides in collecting delinquent taxes through the use of car registration holds and property auctions.
If re-elected, Lenherr would like to boost the efficiency of her office. The new computer system her office just received ought to help with that, she said.

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Now that the June 9 filing deadline has passed, Fluvanna County’s ballot is crowded with contenders for some of the county’s top positions. It can be tough for citizens to keep track of who is running for what office – or even what some of the offices are.
So to make it a little easier, here is a guide that includes every candidate and office up for election on Nov. 3.
Board of Supervisors
The Board of Supervisors is responsible for governing Fluvanna County. Supervisors adopt ordinances, establish budgets, and set priorities for the county. They decide whether to place the county in debt and by how much. The county administrator, who oversees all county staff, reports to the Board. Supervisors decide which projects to approve and levy taxes on citizens to fund those projects. Their term of office is four years.
Running for supervisor in the Palmyra district are Patricia Eager and John Gooch. The winner will take over for current Palmyra supervisor, Bob Ullenbruch, who is not running for re-election.
In the Fork Union district, incumbent Mozell Booker is running unopposed.
The other supervisor seats are not up for election this year.
School Board
The School Board sets the direction for the Fluvanna County Public School system. The Board approves budgets and decides – to the extent permitted by law – how to appropriate funds within the system. The superintendent, who oversees the school system and staff, reports to the Board. The Board sets policies, priorities, and visions for the school system and has the final say on student discipline. A School Board member’s term of office is four years.
Running for School Board in the Palmyra district are incumbent Brenda Pace and challenger Rashelle Williams.
In the Fork Union district, Barbara Cary and Perrie Johnson are running. The winner will replace incumbent Bertha Armstrong, who is not running for re-election.
The other School Board seats are not up for election this year.
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Donated banner. Photo by Tricia Johnson“My name is James A. Bain,” he said, “but I go by Tony.” Tony Bain is a man who has always chosen to give. First, he gave to his country by serving in the U.S. Army. Then he gave to his community with his work as Commander of the Disabled American Veterans Local 33. This day he is giving his uniform and other memorabilia from his time with the First 17th Cavalry 82nd Airborne Division to the Virginia War Memorial Museum.
“My unit was the first unit to be in Desert Storm,” Bain said with pride. “There were just 35 people with two Blackhawks, two 58s and two Cobras - and that’s all there was for the first month,” he said. “We scared Hussein,” he said with a smile. “The remainder of the unit came over the following month, and it took six months to get everything over there – all the army units, tanks, and such,” he said.
Jon Hatfield of the Virginia War Memorial Museum was there to receive the donation and speak to the Veterans Group which meets at the Dogwood Restaurant the last Saturday of each month at 8 a.m. The meeting is open to all veterans, whether they served in peacetime or during war, and regardless of which branch of the service they were in. “I am going to speak to the group for a few minutes about the Virginia War Memorial Museum and the programs that we have to help educate students about the cost of freedom,” Hatfield said. “Getting a uniform donated today to our displays at the war memorial is a great help. When I went in the service,” Hatfield said, “everybody went in the service - the draft was in full force. Now less than 1 percent of our population is involved with the military which means of course 99 percent are not; and if 99 percent do not know the role the military takes in protecting our freedoms, well, we need to teach them.”
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