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May 2 will be Fluvanna County’s last day with Ryant Washington as sheriff.
Washington is resigning his post in order to become the special policy advisor for law enforcement for the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC.)
Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced Washington’s four-year appointment Tuesday (April 22).
In his new position Washington will work toward increasing the effectiveness of ABC, an agency that has fallen under severe scrutiny in the last year.
The ABC came under fire last April after plainclothes ABC agents attempted to arrest a University of Virginia woman as she walked out of a Harris Teeter grocery store in the Barracks Road Shopping Center in Charlottesville. Elizabeth K. Daly, who was underage, carried with her a case of what agents believed to be beer but actually proved to be sparkling water.
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In a surprising first for Fluvanna County, supervisors passed the fiscal year 2015 capital improvements plan, operational budget, and tax rate without any discussion whatsoever.
After their meeting Wednesday night (April 16), Chairperson Mozell Booker and Supervisor Don Weaver confirmed that neither could remember a time when that had happened before.
By a vote of 3-2, with Weaver and Supervisor Bob Ullenbruch dissenting, the Board adopted a real property tax rate of 88 cents per $100 valuation to fund an operational budget of $80.1 million. This budget includes the capital improvement plan (CIP) budget of $15.6 million. Supervisors also approved the CIP for fiscal years 2016-2019, but it remains flexible.
Supervisors have spent several meetings and work sessions discussing the budget, most notably having what Supervisor Tony O’Brien called a “robust” conversation on the night of the public hearing. And under the leadership of Booker, who routinely asks each supervisor in turn for his opinion, Board members have a good idea of where the others stand. “I think we already knew pretty well how things were,” said Weaver. 
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More than 200 family and friends gathered at New Fork Baptist Church to celebrate Audrey Smith’s 100th birthday Saturday (April 19). Photo by Ruthann CarrMore than 200 people gathered at New Fork Baptist Church to celebrate Audrey Smith’s 100th birthday Saturday (April 19).
Smith was born on April 22, 1914 in Scottsville to Jackson Lightfoot and Annette Carmen Cooper Lightfoot.
Her son, the Rev. Thomas Smith, welcomed the guests and prayed.
“Few of us will live to be 100,” Smith said. “Few have lived to be called centenarians. By your divine wisdom and grace you deemed it that Audrey Lightfoot Smith lived to see her 100th year. Thank you for all that you’ve done, all you do and will continue to do in her life.”
Audrey Smith sat in the first pew surrounded by her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
When Audrey Smith was a teenager, she moved to New York City. One of her first jobs was working concessions at Coney Island.
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Vote for John Verga to help him win a custom wheelchair accessible vehicle. Photo by Page H. GiffordBeing born with the birth defect Spina bifida has taught John Verga some tough lessons in life but it has also taught him how to live.
Spina bifida can begin to develop in a fetus before the mother is even aware she is pregnant. In some cases, structures that should be inside the spinal canal can slip out; including membranes that surround the spinal cord, nerve roots that connect nerves to the spinal cord, the spinal cord itself or the vertebra (back bones) may be deformed. This often results in endless surgery and a dismal diagnosis of paralysis.
“I have been in a wheelchair all of my life except for those years when I was in braces and on crutches,” said Verga who used the wheel chair full time once he began attending college. “I had been in and out of the hospitals most of my life and by the time I as 15, I already had 21 surgeries.”
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Craig Girard along with his son enjoy gaming at this years CoveCon event. Photo by Ruthann CarrWho says playing board games and cards is a dying pastime?
Based on the more than 40 people who took over a room at the Lake Monticello clubhouse Saturday (April 12) for the second CoveCon, it may even be growing.
The bar was set with food and drink and card tables were set with every strategic board game imaginable. Craig Girard was pleased.
“I wanted to create a day where gamers came together to not only play games but to experience the creativity of those within the group and in our community,” said Girard, the instigator.
Girard hosted the first CoveCon at his Lake Monticello home last year. It was such a success, he decided to do it again, only this time, host it at the clubhouse.

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