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A fully-loaded propane tanker overturned on Ridge Road in Fluvanna around 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday (Dec. 6), according to a press release issued by Cheryl Elliott, emergency services coordinator.

“There are no injuries, breaches or leaks from the accident, and a 500-foot buffer around the tanker has been established. There is currently no need for residential evacuation due to the accident,” according to the release.

Central Virginia Electric Cooperative (CVEC) de-energized a section of electric distribution line beginning near Bybee’s Church Road, affecting locations down the line, said Greg Kelly, CVEC communications manager. “CVEC will attempt a partial restoration of service while the tanker is being cleared to reduce the number of affected members,” he said. “Once the tanker has been cleared, the line will be re-energized.”

The Fluvanna Fire Department is working with the truck’s owner to upright the truck, according to the release.

Ridge Road between Bybee’s Church Road and Rising Sun Road was closed for the afternoon, according to the release.

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John Hughes tells stories about his father, grandfather and great-grandfather, who all served as Fluvanna County sheriffs. Photo by Ruthann CarrA small group gathered in the Historic Courthouse in Palmyra on Saturday (Dec. 3) to honor Fluvanna sheriffs past and present.

Sponsored by the Fluvanna Historical Society, the event attracted people interested in those who served and what their job was like.

Former Sheriff Ryant Washington spoke to the group before heading down to the Democratic caucus in Farmville where he was picked to run for the 22nd District seat in the state Senate.

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Alex Waring with Grayson-broad wing hawkDeveloping awareness about wildlife is like learning about another culture.

Each species has been on this earth for centuries and has learned to survive and procreate without much help from humans. Yet there are times when it is necessary for people to intervene and help. This is where the Wildlife Center of Virginia (WCV) in Waynesboro comes into play.

On Nov. 19 the Lake Monticello Wildlife Committee sponsored programs called Wild Winter Worlds (Winter Adaptations) and Home Sweet Habitat at Grace and Glory Church in Palmyra. The events featured guest speaker Alex Waring, WCV outreach coordinator. Waring was accompanied by three wild friends: Wilson, an eastern box turtle; Phoebe, a 3-year-old opossum; and Grayson, a 9-year-old broad-winged hawk.

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Whiskey bottles from the Scottsville Dispensary, collection of Jack Hammer.Jack Hamner, a Scottsville native, has a long history of collecting glass bottles of Scottsville-based products. Some of these bottles he found under the old Tavern on Main Street when he lived in that historic, and then drafty, structure years ago. His collection was somewhat depleted upon the birth of his first child, when his wife Ann suggested either the bottles went or she would. He’s kept a few.

“For a small town, Scottsville has produced an impressive array of bottling companies,” said Hamner. “While many of the bottles themselves were likely produced elsewhere, at least half a dozen boast ‘Scottsville, Virginia’ embossed on them. There were also numerous bottles with paper labels put on by local apothecaries, drug stores, spring water bottlers, and perhaps others.

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Fred Payne posing with a turkey he shot.Could the modern tradition of scanning the prices glued to plastic-wrapped birds fall by the wayside?

If Thanksgiving shoppers knew the joy of catching their own wild turkeys, it probably could. The range of emotions and hours of patience which accompany a truly traditional hunt make feeding the family much more worthwhile.

Avid Fluvanna turkey hunters like Fred Payne are especially fond of catching their own birds.

“A wild turkey is very differently shaped than what you’re used to. It’s a much more streamlined bird,” Payne said. “You go in [the grocery store] and look for a Butterball and it’s typically a young male. They feed them hormones…but there are examples of domestic gobblers that are physically unable to breed because their breasts are too big. They can’t get positioned with a hen, so [hens] have to be artificially inseminated.”

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