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A new traffic pattern is planned for one of Fluvanna’s busiest intersections – the “T” intersection of Rts. 15 and 53 near the village of Palmyra.
About 30 Fluvanna residents attended the Virginia Department of Transportation’s public meeting on Jan. 15 to learn about VDOT’s plans to install a traffic circle just south of the bridge over the Rivanna River. Total costs of the construction are estimated to be $2.6 million, with $1.8 funded by cost-sharing between the state and Fluvanna County; $800,000 is already funded through other sources.
“Traffic forecasts for this were showing that in the future there would need to be a stop light,” said John Rose, project manager. “Virginia has a ‘roundabout first’ policy - we are supposed to examine how a roundabout would work in any area that is projected to need a stop light. This intersection was found to be a good location for a roundabout.”
Stacy Londrey, communications manager for VDOT, said that traffic counts show an average of 5,000 vehicles per day use that section of Rt. 53, and 6,500 vehicles per day drive through that section of Rt. 15. Much of that traffic is headed to and from the high school, she pointed out, and called the roundabout a “safe facility” for young drivers to use. The roundabout is also designed to accommodate the potential addition of a fourth leg should development take place on the eastern side of the intersection, across Rt. 15 from EW Thomas’s Grocery Store.
Rose pointed out that VDOT has kept an eye to the future in designing the roundabout; second lanes and even bypass lanes can be added in the future if need be. VDOT was careful to acquire all of the property rights-of-way necessary for future construction.

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The Market Fluvanna campaign that kicked off back in September is culminating this Saturday (Jan. 24) with an awards reception from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Fluvanna County Public Library.
The awards presentation will take place at 3:30 p.m. and all of Fluvanna is invited to attend.
“We received nearly 200 entries, the majority of which came from the children and schools,” wrote Lake Monticello resident Bill Sullivan, an overseer of the Market Fluvanna campaign, in an email. “They ranged from paintings to drawings, poems, diary entries about historical Fluvanna figures, and a number of videos.”
Cheryl Wilkins, emergency services coordinator and another overseer of the Market Fluvanna campaign, said that the 150 art submissions would be on display in the library during the reception and probably for some time thereafter. The winning pieces, she said, will be displayed at the school board and county offices for a longer time. “We’re excited about being able to use some of the winning pieces in ongoing marketing efforts in the county,” she said.
Winners of the I Love Fluvanna contest will receive a total of $1,625 in cash prizes split amongst age divisions, category awards, and the grand prize. The prizes were provided by local businesses, Wilkins said.
The business promo challenge, in which contestants made DVDs promoting Fluvanna, has $2,500 in cash prizes funded by Fluvanna’s economic development authority.
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Chief on the minds of School Board members at their Jan. 15 meeting was budget planning for next year. A finalized budget, scheduled to be presented to the Fluvanna Board of Supervisors on Feb. 18, will likely be accompanied by a plea for an additional $1.3 million over the current budget, bringing the county’s total responsibility to around $38 million. At the meeting it was announced that all Board members will retain their current positions, with Camilla Washington as chairperson.
Reductions in funding from the state are in large part responsible for the School Board’s request for increased county funds. “Back in June of 2014, the General Assembly finally came together with the governor on the budget… the calculated amount for us was $19,406,467. That was based on an average daily membership (ADM) of 3,526.15,” said Ed Breslauer, finance director of Fluvanna schools. “On Dec. 17, Gov. McAuliffe released his proposed budget amendment, and the department of education released their new budget template based on that. When you use the exact same ADM that the General Assembly and Gov. McDonnell had in their budget we are $111,196 short – even though we have the same number of students.”
“That is about two teachers,” said Breslauer, “or say three to four secretaries, or four to five custodians; five to six aides or six to seven bus drivers. We are going to have to make it up,” Breslauer said, “and that is with us having the exact same number of students.”

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Melissa Colver took the shot. Photo by Stephanie PellicaneThere are some new stars on the basketball court at Fluvanna County High School. A few months ago, special education teacher and basketball coach Nick Ward had an idea. “I thought it would be awesome for our special needs students to get involved in athletics,” he said. Working with Assistant Principal Jason Lee, Athletic Director Scott Morris, and Director of Special Education Katrina Lee, Ward hammered out the details to create a special education basketball team at Fluvanna.
The result was a team composed of special ed students from the classes of Robert Peake, Amy McCauley and Ward. “It’s fun to be on the team,” said 8th grader Diana Feathers. “You have to have courage to play basketball.” On Jan. 9, many high school classes piled into the gym to watch history in the making as the team had their first game against Appomattox.
“We do keep score and students who would not be able to get a shot are also allowed to have a “comp shot,” said Ward. “If the student makes that shot both teams receive one point. The coaches from the teams let the officials – ours are Mr. Barlow and Mr. Lee – know how closely the game should be called for each individual student,” said Ward. While the Fluvanna team lost their first game 41-28, it was a great learning experience for everyone, and they have plenty of other games this season to show their talent.
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Artist David Durovy holds rose intarsia. Photo by Christina Dimeo Guseman

Tucked away on Haden Martin Road is a studio where Fluvanna resident David Durovy works meticulously to create unique wooden art called intarsia.
What started as marquetry, an inlaid form of working with wood, became a new form of art when Durovy’s teacher and intarsia developer Judy Gale Roberts began pulling the designs outward into three dimensions.
“If you’re looking at the image, whatever would be closest to you should be built up,” Durovy explained. “Roberts developed a practice of layering the pieces so they come out in a three-dimensional way.”
Carefully selecting different types of wood for their specific colors, Durovy creates his intarsia without the use of stains. In his rose piece, for example, he used darker and lighter bits of western red cedar with white accents of aspen. He lines up each piece of the pattern with the grain of the wood so that the grain contributes to the three-dimensional feel as it pushes outward. Sometimes he takes an extra step and uses a grinding wheel to make impressions in the wood, such as the fur-like texture on his deer piece.
When Durovy’s wife and daughters sent him to the Smoky Mountains two years ago to take Roberts’ class, he immediately clicked with the art form. “I found I was really quite good at it,” he said.

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