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Action likely needed to stop missed first responder calls

Fluvanna County may need to do something to fix a problem with missed calls by its fire and rescue organizations, the Board of Supervisors learned at its meeting Wednesday night (April 19).

Cheryl Elliott, emergency services coordinator, said that Lake Monticello first responders are unable to respond to 15 percent of first responder calls, which are medically-related calls in which time is of the essence. Other fire and rescue organizations in the county can have difficulty as well.

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Economic development topped the list of concerns among Fluvanna County residents who participated in the 2017 Residents Survey, County Administrator Steve Nichols told the Board of Supervisors at its meeting April 5.

The survey, which ran from Jan. 26 to March 31, received 325 individual responses. Of those who responded, 67 percent were age 50 or older, 64 percent have lived in Fluvanna for more than 10 years, and 61 percent live outside Lake Monticello.

Participants were asked to rate their satisfaction with living in Fluvanna and the quality of the county’s services. They were also asked what they thought should be prioritized by the Board of Supervisors in the coming year.

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Two School Board seats up for grabs

Two Fluvanna County School Board members serving the last year of their terms announced at Wednesday’s (April 12) meeting they will not seek re-election.

Neither the Board chair nor vice chair will be returning. Add a comment

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Supervisors raise taxes nearly 3 percent

Taxes in Fluvanna County are going up by almost 3 percent.

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The public’s right to know was a topic of spirited conversation at a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) training session on Thursday morning (April 6).

About 20 county workers gathered at the high school to learn from Maria Everett, executive director of the Virginia FOIA Council. Many of them are responsible for responding to freedom of information requests from Fluvanna residents.

Everett, who called herself “head FOIA geek,” led a lively interactive session that satisfied FOIA training requirements for her listeners and sparked some interesting discussion.

Throughout the session, Everett called on her listeners to see themselves not just as county workers but also as private citizens, such as parents investigating concerning information regarding their children’s schools. Having that perspective makes a difference when thinking about FOIA, she said.

County workers are a key face of government, Everett said. She joked that her listeners would go home and put on “jeans that ought to have been thrown away years ago and ratty t-shirts.” But, she said, “When you woke up this morning and donned the uniform, you became the government.”

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