Government

One resident comments at tax public hearing

Only one member of the public spoke at the Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors’ Wednesday night (April 13) public hearing on the fiscal year 2017 (FY17) tax rates, capital improvements plan (CIP), and operating budget.

Add a comment

Read more...

Supervisors stake out budget positions

A unanimous fiscal year 2017 (FY17) budget vote seems unlikely, given that members of the Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors staked out passionate yet opposite opinions on the tax rate Wednesday afternoon (April 6).

Add a comment

Read more...

Smith takes over as new economic development director

Jason Smith, Fluvanna’s current director of parks and recreation, will take over as director of community and economic development as current director Bobby Popowicz moves on to a new position in Dayton, Virginia.

“It’s a great fit,” said Smith, who will take over after Popowicz leaves on April 22 and has already begun training. “My position with parks and rec has offered me the opportunity to get out into the community and see how things operate, improve processes, and bring folks together. It all ties back into building relationships.”

Add a comment

Read more...

Popowicz resigns as economic development director

Bobby Popowicz is resigning after four years as Fluvanna’s economic development director.

“I took a position in the town of Dayton, Virginia, as the town manager,” Popowicz said. His last day in Fluvanna will be April 22.

Add a comment

Read more...

Supervisors advertise tax hike

Torn between concerns that residents will leave Fluvanna County over either high taxes or faltering services, the Board of Supervisors voted Wednesday night (March 16) to advertise a real property tax rate of 94 cents per $100 valuation for fiscal year 2017 (FY17).

Chairman Mike Sheridan joined Supervisors Mozell Booker and Tony O’Brien in supporting the 94-cent advertised rate, while Supervisors Don Weaver and Trish Eager voted against it.

Booker and O’Brien have advocated for a 93-cent rate, which equates to a 3.5 percent tax hike, whereas Eager has pushed for keeping the tax rate steady at 89.9 cents.

Add a comment

Read more...