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Eric Hess and his fatherHundreds of Fluvanna seniors and their caregivers gathered Wednesday (Sept. 20) at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church to learn how to prepare for and manage aging.

This third annual senior day was put on by TRIAD, an alliance between law enforcement, seniors and organizations that serve seniors, said Sheriff Eric Hess.

The goal is to reduce the fear of crime and victimization among seniors and increase awareness of scams and frauds targeting them. TRIAD also strives to teach that vulnerable population about services available in the community.

“I know [in the U.S.] 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day. A lot of them, like me, are taking care of their parents,” Hess said, nodding to where his 93-year-old father, Billy Hess, sat.

Hess said he’s had several conversations with his dad about what to say if someone calls the house when he is away.

“So many of them grew up in a time when someone called to say you owed something, you believed them,” he said. “Because they don’t want a bad mark on their name or credit, they’re more likely than younger people to get their wallet out and write a check. There are a lot of scam artists out there.”

The most recent statistics cited in the Virginia Employment Commission’s community profile of Fluvanna show that 17 percent of Fluvannians are 65 or over.

Looking at the crowd and noting the variety of services represented and things to do at Senior Day, Hess seemed proud. “This is just what our community is all about,” he said. Add a comment

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Elementary schoolsFormer Columbia school may become canine training facility

The former Cunningham Elementary School, vacant for four years, will again see students under its roof if an approved sale to The Light Academy, a Fluvanna-based private school, goes through.

The fate of the former Columbia Elementary School is less certain after the Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors deferred a decision Wednesday night (Sept. 20) regarding whether to sell to a law enforcement canine training facility or to a couple seeking to develop affordable apartments.

Cunningham school

Supervisors unanimously approved the sale of the former Cunningham Elementary School near Kidds Store to The Light Academy, a private Christian school, for $118,750.

Currently The Light Academy is located in Centre Court, a shopping center outside Lake Monticello.

“Right now we play in a parking lot,” said Joyce Parr, director of The Light Academy, to supervisors. “While we have ample space, it would be ideal to have [additional] classrooms… It would be nice to expand to have some green space or grass to play in.”

Currently The Light Academy educates 50 students in kindergarten through 10th grade. Parr said she hopes the school will be able to expand through the 12th grade and add a preschool, since “everything seems to be over by the Lake” and she is unaware of any preschool options in the Cunningham section of Fluvanna County. Add a comment

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AntiquesSteve Sylvia traces his interest in the Civil War to his childhood, sparked by his brother’s help reading Shelby Foote’s Shiloh.


But it was a belt buckle that belonged to a long-forgotten Union soldier that may have been the catalyst for a life-long involvement in the history of this nation’s defining conflict, a career writing about Civil War relics, and even appearances on segments of the PBS series Antiques Roadshow.


Following graduation from the University of Maryland’s journalism program and a couple years performing and traveling with a rock and roll band, Sylvia found himself in search of opportunity.


“I had a gal singing for me in 1972. The band broke up. I’m running out of money and she says, ‘My boyfriend is looking for someone in public relations,’” Sylvia said.


“I walked into the interview with her boyfriend and I was wearing a U.S. buckle I had dug. His eyes were riveted on my buckle.”


Their common interest in the Civil War made them good friends and ultimately led to the opportunity for Sylvia to turn that interest into a life-long career.


“‘Did you dig that?’” the man inquired of the buckle.

“Yes, I did,” replied Sylvia. “I dug it at Chancellorsville.”
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Carol FleuretteIt all began when Carol Fleurette moved from Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., an area she said is nothing but desert and residents are lucky if it rains a week out of the year. While going to school at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., she decided to move to Virginia. In 2012, she packed up her truck and bought a horse trailer, putting her horse on one side and her motorcycle on the other. She made the drive in four days. When she arrived she was shocked to see torrential downpours, something she had never experienced.

“I loved seeing all of the frogs, the turtles, and all kinds of animals traveling the roads to get to dry areas,” she said. “At that time, I was living in a 100-year-old cabin in Reva, Va., with my fiancé. That experience fueled my creativity for my first book, The Rain That Would Never End.” The story, written in 2015, follows a little girl and her pet fish, who get stuck in a flood, jump on a boat and go on an adventure, saving other animals along the way.

Following her debut was Not the Same but Not So Different Either. The story examines two brothers who are very different in their appearance, personalities, and interests. At the end of the day, they find out that they are really not that different.

Her recent book, Access Required, came out in 2016. This story is about service dogs and is told from the dog’s perspective. Add a comment

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BreathingThe breath is the first step in most mind-body relaxation skills. Deeper breathing is one of the classic paths to balancing the brain and body. It is the most portable stress reduction skill. You can take it anywhere. Certain breathing practices can restore peace and give us a pause that allows the “wise owl” part of our brain to take charge, preventing overreactions that hurt health and relationships.

The benefits of taking a belly-breathing breath break include:

  • Clearing the mind;
  • Fooling the brain into thinking we’re relaxed;
  • Helping our wise mind get in charge rather than letting the stressed “reptilian” or “hot reactor” part of the brain call the shots;
  • Neutralizing or toning down strong emotions;
  • Setting the stage for calmness;
  • Oxygenating blood, which may enhance alertness and performance; and
  • Exercising the diaphragm in a manner similar to laughter.

If you’ve ever watched a baby breathe, they’re doing a version of belly breathing. You see their abdomen going up and down. For most adults, when we’re not paying attention, our breathing is often shallow and involves just the upper part of the chest. Add a comment

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